DECEMBER 2020
Find Golf Courses in NC and SC
Golfing The Carolinas is an easy to use online golf course directory that makes it a snap to find golf courses in North Carolina and South Carolina to plan a day of golf, or to plan a golf trip. The list of golf courses is broken down by geographical area, making it easier to find a course in the targeted area where you want to play. Or, you can simply browse the site and view our list of golf courses to make future plans, see photos of courses and learn more about where you want to play. Visit www.GolfingTheCarolinas.net today.
Featured Course: Foxfire Resort & Golf Club
9 Foxfire Blvd. - Foxfire Village, NC 27281 - (910) 295-5555
For More Photos & Info CLICK HERE
 
How to Play Shots From the Sand Trap Like a Pro
By Jim Sullivan
 
Tips to Make Golf Enjoyable to All - Guide to Politeness on the Golf Course
By Kev Woodward
Solving the Slice
By James Gatz
On The Side of Humor ...
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Foxfire Resort and Golf Club features 36 holes of world-class, North Carolina golf. For nearly four decades golfers from across the globe have come to Foxfire, seeking our unique blend of layout, natural beauty and high-quality service.

The Grey Fox Course is widely considered the most challenging course in the area. The Grey Fox emphasizes shot-making with a well-bunkered layout with characteristic elevated greens. Golfers must avoid the sand and position the ball on the proper side of the fairway so that they get the best approach angle to the small greens. The Grey Fox is in the best condition it has been in over 10 years, providing all golfers a playable challenge. If you played this course years ago, it is time to return. You will be pleasantly surprised.

The Red Fox Course is the members favorite. This Pinehurst golf course offers wide manicured fairways and large elevated fast rolling greens. Water comes into play on 6 holes requiring forced carries from the back tees but with the option of going around the hazards from the forward tees. Fairway bunkers are strategically placed to grab the wayward shot and there is no lack of sand guarding the greens. This beautiful Gene Hamm design offers plenty of “bail out” places to avoid the most severe drop offs and deep faced bunkers.

Hall of Fame architect Gene Hamm designed these 36 holes to take full advantage of the rolling hills, soft sandy soils and plentiful area lakes.

Visit Our Website at www.foxfireresortandgolf.com
Diverse Southern Pines Golf - 36 Holes: The Grey Fox Course & The Red Fox Course ...
Image: Foxfire Resort & Golf logo
Fear Not The Bunker, Senior Golfers.

When you hole out a bunker shot, it is the GREATEST feeling (in golf) but the bunker shot can be a golfer's worst nightmare as well. So let's learn how to make the sand our friend. If we can remove the fear with the correct practice, fear will become confidence and confidence breeds success. So let's do that now.

Have No Fear.

Fear Not 'The Sand' but become the Master of the Sand.

You can spend the money for a few lessons from your pro and that is fine as long as they are instilling confidence and not fear of getting out. We must eliminate the doubt of the bunker shot. Easy to say but how do we do that? The main reason golfers have problems getting out of the bunker is because of fear of leaving the ball in the bunker. We are defeated before we even swing the club. What we need to do is get past that fear and if we learn the proper way to hit even the easiest shot out of the bunker, that is one less thing you will have to worry about in your golf game.

PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

Aside from my golf tips, practice is the best way to master that dreaded bunker shot. Spend some time in the practice bunker hitting all types of lies. Learn how the bounce on your club works and how to use it properly. Do you know what degree of bounce is on your sand wedge, pitching wedge, and lob wedge?

If not ask your pro. what they are. Once you know the bounce of each club then you can start to practice to see how bounce affects your shots.

Here is a drill that will work miracles on your sand game.

Draw a straight line (perpendicular to target line) about 3 feet long in the sand with a second line starting at the end of the first line but gradually going out on a slight angle (think 1/2 V shape) until the line is three inches behind your first line. Practice entering the sand on the angled (back) line with the bottom of your divot being 3-4 inches in front of the entry point.

Practice doing that until you can consistently hit the angled line. Now place golf balls about 4 inches apart just on the front edge the first (straight) line that you drew in the sand. Starting with the ball nearest you, hit the sand at that point behind the golf ball.That shot should travel 15-20 yards, move down the line hitting the angled line on each ball. See how they all travel different distances?

MASTER THE SAND.

This is how to eliminate the fear of bunkers. If you can spend 30 minutes practicing that drill, the next time you are in a bunker, your brain will take over and hit the sand in the correct place.

This drill is one that I have taught to my golf buddies and many other golfers. It works every time but you must dig it out of the sand.

It is exciting to watch one of my buddies that could not get out of a bunker to save his life, all of a sudden, he is full of confidence and has no fear of bunkers. You will do the same thing with just a few minutes of correct practice.

FORGET WHAT YOU SEE THE PRO'S DO.

Too often, recreational golfers try to mimic what the pros do in the bunker. Golf pros spend hours practicing bunker shot. Most amateurs do not have that luxury, but a few minutes a week will work wonders as long as we practice correctly. Stop making the shot harder than it really is. Take a bit wider stance so your hips can move freely, swing with your shoulders instead of all arms much like a short pitch shot and strike a few inches behind the ball as discussed in the previous paragraph.

KNOW THE SAND.

Different lies and sand conditions affect a bunker shot more than putting the right swing on the ball. Soft, fluffy sand calls for a contact spot further behind the ball. After some rain, a bunker can become hard and compact. This is where knowing the bounce on your different clubs will make a huge difference. If you try a normal bunker shot, your club could bounce off of the hard sand, make solid contact with the ball and send it flying over the green. In this case, use a club with less bounce so it will dig in behind the ball and not bounce into the golf ball. The ball will come out with less spin, so allow more distance before the hole for the ball to land. This is something you should practice when the sand is wet and firm but do not fear the sand.

LIES, LIES, LIES.

The lie of the ball can be your best friend or worst enemy. Your ball can be in the bunker, without room to actually stand in it for a shot. In this case, widen your stance and bend your knees drastically. Avoid bending at the waist because doing so will not allow you to use your upper body in your swing. Swing with your arms and shoulders with your feet still. Let the club slide under the ball like a normal bunker shot.

If your ball is plugged in the bunker, you have some decisions to make. If half of your ball is showing, you can still get out in good condition.

Play the ball back in your stance, pick your club straight up and slam it down right behind the ball.

If the ball is completely buried you may have to take your medicine (an unplayable) or if you have practiced this shot, you know, it will still come out but it takes a lot of speed and you need to allow for lots of roll.

DO NOT QUIT ON A BUNKER SHOT.

Fairway bunker shots are among the hardest in golf. Too often, golfers think they must always use a sand wedge in the sand. For the long bunker shots, use any club that will clear the lip on the bunker. You can hit hybrids out of fairway bunkers as long as you can clear the lip. I play the ball in the middle of my stance so I can ensure ball first contact. Practice will show you where you should play the golf ball. This shot is played with what I call still legs. All the movement should be from the hips up. Play the ball in the middle of your stance so you can contact the ball first.

CONCLUSION.

The sand and bunkers truly are your friends unless you FEAR them. Correct practice turns fear into CONFIDENCE.
Golf is a great game but is easily spoiled when players do not follow simple, common sense politeness on the golf course. Here are some key points of golf etiquette.

Out on the course the other day, we were playing behind a really rude, lousily, foursome and it was truly awful. I am sure they knew better, but just did not care. That said, I thought I would quickly go through a few steps of golf etiquette and what you need to know in order to avoid being labeled as selfish out on the golf course. Golf is a game of honor. It is easy to cheat at golf, so every player is on his honor. Those who don't play honorably are usually unpopular and will find it hard to get opponents as word soon gets round the club. Golf has its own code of etiquette that everyone should follow and obey. Here are just a few that I try to practice. When it is your turn to play, be ready. When walking to your ball, make your decision about the club to use, whether you will hit straight or with draw or fade, the line you will take and so on. That way, when you arrive at the ball, you are ready to hit. You don't have to hurry, just be ready and make your play. The norm is that first shot on any hole goes to the player with the lowest score on the previous hole. If that hole was tied, then the tee goes to the player with the lowest score on the previous hole. If everyone is clear about this, there will be no wasting time deciding who takes the next shot at the next tee. Play it different if you want. Just make sure everyone in your group knows and agrees. Make sure those in front of you have cleared out of range before you hit. Make sure everyone in your foursome is behind you when you hit. Common courtesy as well as sensible health and safety. Pay attention to the group behind you. If you are holding them up, let them play through. Some of us play faster than others. Groups that are unaware of others create annoyance and eventually anger at their selfishness. Take care of the course. Repair your divots. Repair any ball marks. Replace any loose grass or turf in the center of the hole or anywhere there is loose grass. It is the responsibility of every golfer to look after the course. Remember to rake the sand smooth after you have used the bunkers. Leaving them in a mess for the next group is bad form and selfish. Park your cart away from the greens, tees, and bunkers. Park on the left side of the green, nearest the next tee. One thing I see a lot is the people in front of me, are crowding around the hole filling in their score cards, after they have finished the hole. After you have finished a hole, move out the way to mark your score card. Mark your card on the way to the next tee. How hard is that? These are a few things that will make the game better for all of us.
For many new players one of the most frustrating aspects of golf is the slice. For most whom have had played baseball or other types of racket sports the slice is more profound. The golf swing does not come as naturally and contradicts many of the habits learned in other sports. After some hard work and dedication most new players can straighten out their approach enough to have some kind of a respectable level of play. But that is not the case for the driver.

The Drive is the shot which holds the most prestige. For men, being able to drive the ball as far as possible, or further than anyone else, is a matter of esteem and confidence. Which is why it's also the most frustrating shot in golf for new players. Not being able to get out of the tee box with a good drive is the most demoralizing thing a player can do during a round. Keep it up for 18 holes and I guarantee you are not having fun. This can tend to dissuade players from continuing to work on their game or create anxiety when playing with others. With as expensive golf is already, most can't imagine paying for a lessons and without are helpless.

So for those who can relate to the depiction above here is my quick guide to solving the slice in your drive!

Step #1- Slowing it down

- Before even going to the range, just head to your back yard. Grab a tee and some foam practice balls and head to a nice even spot. First we are going to go through our driving motion in a ten second pendulum rhythm. What I mean by that is we are going to extend the swing a full ten seconds from being set on the ball. We are going to do this a couple of times to stretch out and most importantly get your muscle memory working. Concentrate on your alignment and shoulders and the face of your club. Making sure it is square with the ball when it comes to the tee. Then slowly work into your follow through. During the follow through focus on your feet and your hips. Make sure they keep turning all the way through the swing. Finally find your end point. Get your muscle memory working to get them used to following through completely to the end of the full swing. Stopping your swing short is one of the largest factors that contribute to a slice. Do this a couple times of night or even when your just watching television. It may help to do this in front of a mirror as well. Once you have gotten comfortable with your motion start teeing up the practice balls and start with the same slow swing. Do not worry on hitting it far, all we want to do is tap it straight. Try to hit it two feet in front of you while keeping it straight. Then slowly start speeding the swing up. Every time you hit one straight, swing just a little faster the next. See how fast you can build up and still have a straight hit.

Step #2 - Hitting the Range

- The driving range is where all the hard work takes place. Instead of bringing your whole bag, dedicate a training session to only your driver. Driving is the most strenuous swing there is, and requires a good amount of energy each time. It can be very tiring if you are driving 100 balls non-stop. When you get tired your body gets lazy effects your swing. It can be very frustrating when you do not have the energy to hit the ball as you would like. The key hitting 100 quality drives in a practice session is timing. I usually give myself an hour and a half or two hours of range time and split up the balls into 4 x 25 sessions. Each session is all focused on the same swing, and all with the same target. Pick a target that is in distance of your preferred quality drive. Not your best drive ever or your furthest, we want to work for consistency and the build the power. Now for the next part it is best to have a watch or stopwatch to be able to manage your time effectively. Take one minute intervals between each shot and create a pattern of how you approach the ball. Try to mimic it every time until it is an impulse. Between each 25 swing session take a five-minute break and account for every drive that hit the target. Repeat the same formula for the last 75 balls and try to improve upon your targets hit each round. When you are done add them up and keep it as a benchmark for improvement. After a couple of times with this regimen you will really be able to analyze what is helping and what is not.

Step #3 - Getting Club Fit

- Most people are swinging a driver that isn't suited for them. The length, head size, shape, and weight are all factors that need to be considered when purchasing a driver. I would always avoid ordering a club online without having gone through the fitting process beforehand. Usually places that offer these services such as GolfSmith offer a discount on the club and the extra money you spend on the fitting will pay off over the long years of use you are assured. A professional will analyze your swing using cameras and the latest golf technology to deduce all the variables of your own unique swing. This is so important for anybody looking to made great strides in their game. Having a club that conforms to your natural swing allows for greater consistency and feel to be achieved overtime. You will be amazed how different each club swings and having the chance to try a variety will really make you feel more comfortable with your driver once you find the right one.
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Featured Course:
Foxfire Resort & Golf Club
9 Foxfire Blvd. - Foxfire Village, NC 27281
(910) 295-5555
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